Oklahoma City leading the US out of recession

9 01 2012

High fives all around!  You’ve done it again, Oklahoma!

US News and World Report named Oklahoma City and Tulsa the #1 and #3 cities in the US that are leading the nation out of the recession.  What does this mean?  It means we’ve got JOBS, baby!  It means we have affordable houses.  It means we have a thriving local economy.  It means that our thriving local economy provides money to improve our city and create more jobs.

It means that you need to move here. 

Here’s the article for those of you who like to see who we beat.  And please contact me when you’re ready to see if the grass really is greener in the Heartland.

Wilhelm Koenig


photo by KevinLallier. Some rights reserved.


Where will you be in 15 years?

3 01 2012

How about debt-free?

The average American who starts a 30 year mortgage pays it off in 37 years.  The average American on a 15 year mortgage pays it off in 8 years.

Are you above average?

If so, let’s talk.  I’d like to help you save tens of thousands of dollars on your home.

Wilhelm Koenig

405.249.5993 cell

How to get $1/2 Million Dollars Ahead.

27 12 2011

Small steps for big results.

In life, there are a few small actions that you can do that will have a tremendous benefit for you.  The biggest is to start and grow your own successful business.  But whether you’re an entrepreneur or not, everyone needs a roof over their head.  And how you finance that roof can put over $500,000 in your pocket or someone else’s.

The average renter in Oklahoma pays about $750 per month in rent.  Property values and rent typically rise about 3% per year in Oklahoma, and over the 30 years that typically make up your working life, you would have spent $435,019 in rent, and have not even on cent of equity.  That’s what I call a terrible deal.

By buying a home with a similar monthly payment, not only would you own a paid-for home worth $327,680, but you would have saved $53,640 on your taxes as well.  By year five in your home, you would have received more back on your tax returns than you put down for the down payment.  The IRS pays you back for your investment, you make the same monthly payment for a house that pays YOU back.  That’s what I call a smart deal.

Let’s look at the math:


Costs                                             $-488,659.00

Benefits                                                      $0.00

Total                                             $-488,659.00

Owning a home:

Costs:                                            $-237,172.00

Benefits, equity                            $327,680.00

Benefits, tax savings                      $53,640.00

Total                                                $144,148.00

So you can pay almost $1/2 Million to a landlord for no benefits, or you can pay yourself and come out over $1/2 Million ahead.  It’s your choice.  And when you’re ready to make a smart choice for you, I’d like to help you.

Wilhelm Koenig

405.249.5993 cell

What you need to know when buying a flipped property.

10 10 2011

Here’s the HUD memo that details the extension on the waiver of anti-flipping regulations.  It gets pretty tricky and double-negative-y pretty quickly, so here’s the simplest way I explain it:

During the housing bubble days, when homes were increasing in value quickly, home flippers would buy homes, do minimal repairs (ie paint) and sell it quickly for a profit.  Some of these homes had major issues like mold that had been quickly painted over, or foundation issues that had been temporarily patched together.  Also, some of these transactions had fraudulent, selling a home for more than it was worth to a buyer who never intended to live there, and who received a cut of the money from the sale.

 So HUD looks very closely at any transactions where the seller bought the property less than 6 months before the new sale.  They are looking to make sure that the property is in good shape, that it is worth the sales price, and that the transaction isn’t fraudulent.  Here’s what that means to you:

 Normally HUD would not even allow any sales under 90 days after when the seller purchased the home.  The only exceptions were when the seller inherited the property, since this would not be a sale, or a typical investor buying and flipping properties.  HUD recently started allowing transactions under 90 days if the house and the transaction meet additional guidelines.  Even though HUD will allow this, not many investors will close transactions under 90 days.  Check with your lender if they will allow FHA closes under 90 days.  But here are HUD’s guidelines for closing an FHA loan during the 90 day period:

1. The transaction is arms-length: no business relationships between the seller, buyer, or other parties in the transaction.  The seller is on title to the property.  If an LLC or other company is involved in the transaction, it was already established before the transaction began and was operating according to applicable laws. 

2. The property’s value is accurate: It has not been bought and resold multiple times in the past 12 months.  It was marketed on the MLS.  If the value increased more than 20%, then you must document the value with the following:

    a.  Appraiser documents the improvements to the property and the reasons for the increase in value. (usually this will be copies of the repair receipts and invoices from the seller)

     b.  A home inspection.  Any health issues (mold, unsafe gas heaters, etc) or structural issues (foundations, roofs, etc) must be repaired and the repair must be documented by the home inspector or the appraiser.

Most lenders require a second appraisal to double-check the value and condition of the home.  The lower value of the two appraisals will be used and any repairs mentioned by the appraisers must be fixed and documented like on 2b.

The bottom line is that it CAN be done, to close a flipped property in under 90 days.  But you need an excellent, proactive lender who addresses these additional issues for buying a flipped property.  And I’d love to be that excellent, proactive lender for you.  As always, I’m here to serve you.

Wilhelm Koenig

Why do I get to skip a payment when I buy or refi?

3 10 2011

In some situations, you could skip two payments.  But let’s take a closer look at what is happening with the first payment on your loan.

Interest is always paid in arrears on a loan.  This means that the interest has to accumulate before there is anything to pay.  It’s like a water bill- you use the water first, the utility company checks to see how much you owe, and then bills you the next month for the previous month’s usage.  So the interest accrues during your skipped month and your first payment applies to the interest from the previous month and the loan principal.  That’s why you get to skip a month.

How do I get to skip two months?  If your loan funds during the first 5 days of the month, you could pay less closing costs and skip one payment, or pay slightly more and skip two.  Since you are only paying the interest for the skipped month, it’s usually only about 2/3rds of what the normal payment would be.

Many times a home purchase or refinance happens when you’re going through a life change– a new marriage, baby, job relocation, divorce or death in the family—and many times skipping one or two payments helps with all the small “other” costs that go along with these life changes, whether they are diapers for babies or diapers for taking in elderly parents.

I am honored to help you save money on your home financing, especially when you are going through these life transitions.  So far I have saved fellow Oklahomans $18.3 million on their homes this year, and I want to help you be a part of that savings.  Please reach out to me, and I’m happy to help.

As always, here to serve,

Wilhelm Koenig


0% Down Payment VA loans: Could you be Eligible?

27 08 2011

There is a lot of misinformation about VA loans.  I’ve heard everything from “it’s too difficult,” to “I don’t like the VA, so I’m not going to consider a VA loan.“ But let’s look at the facts, because a VA loan could be the best program for you.  In our post-meltdown days, it is one of the few no down payment programs still around.  Plus, there is no monthly mortgage insurance, so you can buy a better home with a more affordable payment.  But first let’s look at who can qualify:


Any eligible veteran who served more than 90 days of active duty during a time of war or 181 days of duty during peacetime should be eligible for VA home buying benefits, with certain exceptions.


Reservists with more than 6 years of duty should be eligible for the benefits.

Spouses of veterans

Surviving, unmarried spouses of deceased veterans can be eligible to receive their ex-spouse’s eligibility, as long as their deceased spouse was eligible.

To make sure you are eligible for the benefits, you will need a certificate of eligibility from the VA.  You can receive your COE online, from your lender, or directly from the VA by mailing in your request for COE.  Based on your situation, you may need to supply some other documentation to receive your COE, like your DD214 discharge papers, or LES statement.

A VA loan is unlike any other mortgage.  A well-done VA loan can open the doors to a house for you with perks you can’t get anywhere else.  But a poorly-done VA loan could be a nightmare, taking unnecessary time, money, and documents.  The biggest key to a smooth process is choosing a lender who has years of experience with VA loans and who knows the specific VA guidelines.  So do your research and hire the one whose experience and knowledge gives you confidence that they can get it done smoothly.

Thank you for your service for our country.  I hope I or another colleague can serve you as our way of saying thank you.

Do I have to pay for closing costs too?

5 07 2011

It depends on how you write your contract. 

Look at this house, the parts of the home represent the parts of a mortgage.  The door is the down payment, the house is the loan, and the chimney are the closing costs, because they stick up above the rest of the house.

If the sales price is $100,000 and the down payment is 5%, then the door costs $5,000 and the home costs $95,000.  The closing costs probably would be around $3,500. 

So if you ask for the seller to pay for your chimney, you can get into your home with only paying for the door ($5,000.) 

Sometimes the seller will pay for the chimney only if you raise the sales price to cover the cost of the chimney.  The new sales price would be $103,500, the down payment would be $5,175, and you would pay no closing costs. 

In either case, it is extremely important to hire a competent loan officer and realtor who both work for you.  I would love to explain your loan details as clearly as the example above and put you in touch with a solid realtor who will work to make the transaction fit your needs.  Please reach out to me when you need help financing your home.